Everything We Know About The PS4 So Far

I’ve written a few articles on the new PlayStation and its Microsoft counterpart lately, but this is more of an important update.  This is everything we know about the PlayStation 4, or ‘Orbis’.

This is information that has been sourced from official Sony documentation which includes over 90 PDFs.  The information below does not contain the final release date of the console, or even its confirmed name in fact.  What is included however, are all the important things.  Details about the new hardware, specs and accounts system.

Read on for more…

The Controller

PS4Controller

Seems legit…

The PlayStation, PlayStation 2 and PS3 have all had very similar controllers.  The new controller’s set to keep many of the core features that we’ve grown to love including two thumbsticks, shoulder triggers and the iconic PlayStation face buttons.  There is also a fair chance that Sony’s Move controller will still be compatible with the new console.

Other key features that are here to stay include motion control which now features improved technology, such as “tilt-correction”.  The controller will also come with the standard vibration feature and an RGB LED light.

In an earlier article, I mentioned some of the possible changes that would be made to the PlayStation controller.  I stated that some possible changes could be the loss of the dual shock design, which is now looking unlikely, and also that the controller would feature a touch screen, taking some inspiration from the Vita.

While the controller won’t feature a touch screen per se, instead it will have a touch pad, like the one located on the back of the Vita.  This has the ability to recognize two-point multi-touch and the entire pad can also be “clicked” as an additional input.

It’s still not known whether the new controller will feature “biometric” technology or not, however, it will feature a “share” button.  We’re not completely sure what it does but it would be safe to assume that it will have something to do with sharing your game experience on Facebook or Twitter.  Like Steam’s screenshot feature, maybe?

Accounts

Then again, the “share” button might have something to do with the way you use your PlayStation account.  With the current gen (excluding the 360), you always sign into the console as a single user, but now Sony is planning to change that with something called “multi-user simultaneous logins”, whatever that is…

This is achieved by linking each separate controller to a different account.  Every time that the user would connect a new controller, the console will ask what account they wish to sign in with.  Simple.

This means that when playing a game, any trophy earned will be registered for all accounts that are linked to the console at that time.

It’s still unclear whether this features is also linked to the PlayStation Network.  Of course though, we’ve really seen this already, for years in fact, on the Xbox 360.

The Specs

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This is undoubtedly what I am most interested in.  The new hardware.

The specs that you see below are actually for the PS4 development kit, so while a lot of this may well appear in the final product, things can still change.

  • System Memory: 8GB
  • Video Memory: 2.2 GB
  • CPU: 4x Dual-Core AMD64 “Bulldozer” (so, 8x cores)
  • GPU: AMD R10xx
  • Ports: 4x USB 3.0, 2x Ethernet
  • Drive: Blu-Ray
  • HDD: 160GB
  • Audio Output: HDMI & Optical, 2.0, 5.1 & 7.1 channels

Don’t worry about the small HDD size and the extra ethernet port, this is after all a development device, these details will change.

One last thing is the appearance of a headphone jack on the front of the console, but it still isn’t confirmed whether it will be there on the final product.

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That’s all for now.  In my opinion, this console is certainly shaping up to be better than its predecessor.  It’s still a fair while until the release of the ‘Orbis’, since Sony are letting Microsoft make the first move again, so I’d like to stress that while some of this information is certainly likely to be proved true, nothing is set in concrete.  Patience is a virtue, after all.

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